Nightingales

Press

“The Nightingales play a uniquely indigenous, all-encompassing brand of working class rock ‘n’ roll. Beneath the Beefheart lurch and the Stooges stomp you can hear football chants and northern soul, blues and bluebeat, folk song and country and western; even music hall and Frank Sinatra. Filter this through mainman Robert Lloyd’s own experiences, observations, temperament and talent and you’ve got music that is as original as it is uncompromising.”
Ben Graham/Stool Pigeon, UK
“Yet nothing in Subway Sect's admittedly excellent return could have prepared for the astonishing revelation of Robert Lloyd's Nightingales. Feeding off the hard-drilled energy of the junior initiates, Apperley spins frayed Bo Diddley riffs around Lloyd's tumbling psychedelic eavesdroppings, allowing the singer to recycle, reinvent and repurpose thirty years of vituperative notebook aphorisms, constructing an intense, breathless narrative from the recycled past to the scorched present. The cumulative effect is one of euphoric delight, of old knowledge in the hands of new disciples. Contender for gig of the year!”
Andrew Male/Mojo, UK
“The ‘Gales are consistently one of the best live experiences in the country. Forty minutes segued together seamlessly, a cocktail of 60’s garage and psychedelia shaken up with krautrock. It’s heady, fresh and invigorating.”
Brighton Noise, UK
“It’s thrilling to watch the songs’ complex arrangements come to life and the surplus of ideas on display is nothing short of dizzying.”
Lewis Porteous/The Fly, UK
“A loud, awkward, exciting live act. They were droll, surly, ace, a proper rock & roll group.”
David Bennun/Mail On Sunday, UK
“A mean machine since returning to active duty. The blunt, raucous attack of their new album ‘No Love Lost’ was finessed into a seamless set of powering post-punk rock ‘n’ roll by a fiery unit who were totally in command.”
Fiona Shepherd/The Scotsman, UK
“This is one of the best live bands in the UK at the moment. Fliss Kitson is one of the most amazing drummers you are ever likely to see.”
Ged Babey/Louder Than War, UK
“The Nightingales play with rock in a manner that is sometimes difficult, belligerent and downright confusing, but never fails to be utterly compelling.”
Silent Radio, UK
“I would say this is my favourite album of the year. I love all their albums but this is definitely their best. I've spent everyday since it was released listening to it at least once. It depresses me how few people know about this band. Robert Llyod needs to be recognised as one Britain's greatest ever poets and the band celebrated the world over.I wont be satisified till The Nightingales get invited to play the Rock and Roll hall of fame and storm it in a big drunken dangerous spectacular mess or fall on their faces in the attempt.”
Eddie Argos/Brooklyn Vegan, USA
“***** Listening to their new album it’s easy to see why they inspire such devotion. The Nightingales are more than a punk band; they might just be among the best song writers we’ve got.”
Dave Canning/Artrocker, UK
“***** I don’t do five star, but this disc somehow merges outsiderism with the raw immediacy of The Who, Family or Led Zep. This utterly astonishing slice of genius proves post-punk lives and pop wilts.”
Nick Toczek/Rock & Reel, UK
“**** ‘No Love Lost’ is defiantly uncompromising, the proffered handshake turned thumbed nose from a heretical ranter, drunk on bile and defiance. Gems of bare Pinteresque poetry are hidden under a roadside shrub of English noise. Yet, once the listener is immersed in Lloyd’s holloway, pickings are rich and sweet, a middle aged man’s desperation at this “damned world of nothing really” transformed by his multi-generational moral chartists into an astonishing, invigorating album of raging righteous attack.”
Mojo, UK
“**** Fiercely energised, it presents art-punk-rock ‘n’ roll almost as literary form, such is Lloyd’s fragmented oratory on life’s sinister mundanities.”
Ian Harrison/Q, UK
“Peel show favourites, Fall comparison, National Institution blah blah blah… look, the fact is that Robert Lloyd's re-energised combo are still putting out vital records capable of competing with 2012's finest on any terms, and not just those of cosy nostalgia for the days of post-punk and steam-powered radio. No Love Lost is a bristling torrent of ideas, anger, danceable rhythms and caustic melody, and it's designed to make you feel anything but comfortable. Nostalgia is not in their vocabulary: times were tough then and they're tough now, but the Nightingales band still barks at the squares.”
The Quietus, UK
“Lloyd’s always been a Brummie legend but he’s reached the status of national treasure now.”
Sounds XP, UK
“Incendiary and uncompromising.”
Paul Pledger/Flipside, UK
“The Nightingales haven't gained any new senior geriatric reticence nor lost any of the sporadic vitriol they possessed during their formative years, with pretty much all of the tracks as off-the-wall as you'd hoped for. Take the opening song for example, I can't see that sneaking past the censors in radio-land, nor a few others on here, but there are some total belters nonetheless, the equal of anything the band has released in the past."Real Gone Daddy" and the closing "Dick the Do-Gooder" are as beautifully eccentric as The Nightingales can be, while the acoustically-driven "The World of Nothing Really" shits on Sheeran from a great height. Whilst not a household name nor a playlist necessity these days, the very mention of The Nightingales in certain circles is enough to cause all manner of palpitations, much like this off-kilter hamper of eccentric alternatives. And no-one can bellow quite like Robert Lloyd - he sounds for all the world like a man wired up to the mains by his balls, and for that reason alone, you should consider aiming your next financial outgoings in the direction of this album.”
Paul Pledger/All Gigs, UK
“Often compared to the Fall. Since their reformation in 2004, the ‘Gales have been the consistently better band, musically more inventive and powerful and lyrically funnier and more astute.Also, as a songwriter, Robert Lloyd is as much of a genius as Morrissey or Nick Cave. He has a similar idiosyncratic, very English outlook and outdoes Moz with his brutal lyrical dexterity and has the same kind of dark, comic intensity as Cave, only Lloyd is ten times less successful. I can only put this down to bad luck and maybe the fact that he failed to have an iconic hairstyle at a key moment in his career unlike t'other two. More appropriate comparisons though would be the comedy of Stewart Lee (a ‘Gales fan) and the plays of Mike Leigh.
The ever-shifting line up of Nightingales has settled and they make a brilliant racket. It rocks, it bewilders, it shambles, it kicks ass and it makes you laugh and scratch your head and wonder what the fuck all that was about.
They have always been a ‘difficult' band; wilfully awkward, avoiding choruses and obvious time signatures, but occasionally just to prove they can they pull off a magnificent pop-song.
I could go on (and on, and on) as I love the Nightingales but can't quite put finger on why. Its something to do with the fact that they are outsiders and under-dogs, surly and sarky, yet intelligent and charming; unique and unrivalled and It takes a while to ‘dig' them. You have to work at it; they are not an immediate band musically. But if you put the time and effort in you reap the rewards in spades.
What makes this album and the current line-up extra special is a unique combination of ages. Youth and the wisdom of age combined. Lyrical bile and incendiary music. World-weary but ready to storm the barricades of mediocrity and boredom. Its loud, its rude, it kicks like a mule and its astounding that the Nightingales have made one of the best albums of the year. Well done underdogs!”
Louder Than War, UK
“With The Fall getting Lifetime Achievement awards and Gang Of Four canonised it is long past time the wayward genius of Robert Lloyd and his cohorts was recognised.”
Record Collector, UK
“Consistently excellent, the Nightingales are back, as ferociously sardonic as ever. Nice to see them still mad, still funny, still wrecking the furniture after all these years.”
Dusted, USA
“Shows just how poor these skinny jeaned little shits currently doing the rounds really are.”
Tasty, UK
“It gave me headache.”
Rock Delux, Spain
“The Nightingales - they're back and they're marvellous.”
Marc Riley/BBC 6 Music, UK
“Nightingales are unreal. The level of playing and songwriting after their post-punk hiatus is unparalled by any of their generational comeback cohorts.”
Terre T/WFMU, USA
“Rock & Roll at its best.”
Suddeutsche Zeitung, Germany
“Lloyd is the most underestimated songwriter of his generation.”
The Independent, UK
“The Nightingales in Southend on Friday jetted in to my top ten gigs of all time.”
Phill Jupitus/BBC 6 Music, UK
“Forget all these NME Band of the Week types, who make out they don't care, they won't compromise, etc, whilst wearing the same indie uniform and churning out the same tired old riffs. They don't need your attention. The Nightingales do. Because rock 'n' roll rarely gets as uncompromising as this.”
Plastelin, Serbia
“The Nightingales revisited their past and offered up the future. Still stunningly relevant.”
London Evening Standard, UK
“The Nightingales subjugate a rapt and breathless Spitz with a performance of sinewy magnificence.”
Daily Telegraph, UK
“Tuesday night at the Cake Shop in NYC. One of the best shows I've seen in years. Jangly, angsty, angular, punk, post-punk, just rock and roll, whatever, they destroyed.”
Dan Selzer/Ilxor, US
“The Nightingales have been responsible for some of the most genuinely innovative minority music of the past three decades. What's more with the release of Insult To Injury they have significantly raised their game. In fact, this is undoubtedly their finest moment.”
The Quietus, UK
“Boozy and deranged, Insult to Injury is how the new Franz record ought to sound.”
Vice, UK
“This is a living, breathing beast of an album.”
Artrocker Magazine, UK
“This is their fiercest, most lacerating album yet, better by a good margin than the mid-1980s Pigs on Purpose... and that was excellent.”
Blurt, USA
“Their freshest and most subtly intoxicating work to date.”
Observer Music Monthly, UK
“They sound wired, edgy, boozy and as dangerous as ever, like a new band full of that energy that comes with those first moves and not a band who’ve been doing this since the start of punk. Robert Lloyd really shouldn’t be this good after all these years, should he?”
The Organ, UK
“The new album from the 'Gales is their finest for 27 years. Start here and work backwards.”
Sunday Times, UK
“Unlovable as ever. The Nightingales remain hard work for precious little gain.”
Mojo, UK

Nightingales